Firewise

On this page:

Wildfire Series: Protect Your Michigan Home from Wildfire

Certain areas of Michigan are prone to forest fires. There are steps one can take for various measures to protect homes and other buildings from being as likely to burn down during a wildfire. Examples (covered in this bulletin) include creation of fuel breaks (3 foot ring around your home and buildings without burnable vegetation, using fire resistant plants and prune lower branches of trees in a 30 foot ring, 30-100 foot area thin trees); driveway design (12 feet wide, 15 feet high, gate location); address display; spark arrestor; enclosed open eaves, soffits, and gabble vents; non-combustible roof which is kept clean.

Wildfire Series: Protect Your Michigan Home from Wildfire

Land Use Series: Sample Wildfire Hazard Zoning

Certain areas of Michigan are prone to forest fires. Some communities have zoning provisions concerning various measures to protect homes and other buildings from being as likely to burn down during a wildfire. This Land Use Series presents four sample approaches to incorporate wildfire prevention into a zoning ordinance. The four approaches are presented that range from educating property owners in wildfire hazard areas to regulating property access, landscaping, and building materials. The range of approaches is presented for local governments to select the most appropriate option, based on local conditions and circumstances. In total, the four approaches are intended to allow any community with wildfire risk to incorporate ‘firewise’ principles in the zoning ordinance.

Land Use Series: Sample Wildfire Hazard Zoning

Wildfire Series: Wildfire-resistant Landscape Plants for Michigan

Certain areas of Michigan are prone to forest fires. (Such as an area which has predominantly evergreen tree species with lower branches which do not die off and are near to the ground, such as, but not limited to, Jack Pine or Scrub Pine (Pinus banksiana), Scotch Pine or Scotch Fir (Pinus Sylvestris), Red Pine or Norway Pine (Pinus resinosa), Spruces (Picea), Hemlock (Tsuga candensis), and Cedars or Junipers (Pinaceae); and other situations where structures encroach into wildlands.) Some communities have zoning provisions concerning various measures to protect homes and other buildings from being as likely to burn down during a wildfire. Often the regulations call for using fire resistant plants within a 30 foot area around the home. This bulletin lists such plants which can grow in Michigan.

Wildfire Series: Wildfire-resistant Landscape Plants for Michigan