Planning Generally and Checklists

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Summary of changes between new Michigan Planning Enabling Act and the three old planning acts: Municipal Planning Act, County Planning Act, and Township Planning Act

This document summarizes the changes between Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 and the three former planning enabling acts:

  • Municipal Planning Act (being P.A. 285 of 1931, as amended, M.C.L. 125.31 et seq.)
  • County Planning Act (being P.A. 282 of 1945, as amended, M.C.L. 125.101 et seq.)
  • Township Planning Act (being P.A. 168 of 1959, as amended, M.C.L. 125.321 et seq.)

Summary of changes between new Michigan Planning Enabling Act and the three old planning acts: Municipal Planning Act, County Planning Act, and Township Planning Act.

Steps to transition an existing planning commission to comply with the Michigan Planning Enabling Act

Presents a decision tree in the form of a flow chart with “yes” and “no” questions to help a community determine what they may need to do in terms of updating or replacing the resolution or ordinance creating their planning commission and updating or replacing the planning commission’s bylaws. It is designed to make the transition from the soon-to-be repealed planning acts to the requirements of the Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008.

Steps to transition an existing planning commission to comply with the Michigan Planning Enabling Act.

Content of a Plan

Presents a couple of ways to look at what should be the content of a Master Plan in Michigan. The checklist follows “best planning practice” as reflected by the guidelines adopted by the law committee of the Michigan Association of Planning as well as to comply with the Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

Content of a Plan.

Adoption of a Plan in Michigan

Presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of adopting a plan in Michigan. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 (and Michigan Zoning Enabling Act of 2006, as amended,) statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

Adoption of a Plan in Michigan.

The Five Year Plan Review

Once a plan is over five years old, it needs to be reviewed to determine if it should be replaced or not. This document presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of assessing its existing plan. It includes some criteria for making that assessment. Next it walks through the process of deciding if the plan should be replaced with a new one, amended/updated, or does not need modification. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

The Five Year Plan Review.

Adoption of an Amendment to a Plan

Presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of adopting a plan amendment in Michigan. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 (and Michigan Zoning Enabling Act of 2006, as amended,) statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

Adoption of an Amendment to a Plan.

Adopting and Updating a Capital Improvement Program

Presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of adopting an capital improvement program in Michigan. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008. 

Adopting and Updating a Capital Improvement Program.

Review of Infrastructure/Public Capital Expenditure

This document presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of reviewing proposed infrastructure and capital expenditures. It includes some criteria for making that assessment. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

Review of Infrastructure/Public Capital Expenditure.

For Adoption of a Subdivision Ordinance Governing the Subdivision of Land in Michigan

This document presents a chronological step-by-step checklist to walk a county, village and city, or township through the process of adopting a Subdivision Ordinance, or rules. The checklist follows Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 statutory requirements, superceding the old acts as of September 1, 2008.

For Adoption of a Subdivision Ordinance Governing the Subdivision of Land in Michigan.

Planning Under Michigan Planning Enabling Acts: The Wexford County Example

In 2001, for the first time in decades, major amendments were made to Michigan’s Planning Enabling Acts. Those changes were retained in the 2008 Michigan Planning Enabling Act. This bulletin will summarize the new statutory process, and provide additional suggestions reflecting state-of-the-art public participation for communities to do planning with a high degree of coordination and public involvement.  The new statutory requirements can be made into a major advantage for a community doing planning. Wexford County was one of the first counties to prepare a new plan under the new statute requirements.  MSU Extension and Extension Victor Institute for Land Use and Development, with a grant from the United States Forest Service, used the Wexford Planning process for research and to assist the county in working with the new procedures to the county’s advantage.  This bulletin also shares that experience and research to help others learn what worked well.

Planning Under Michigan Planning Enabling Acts: The Wexford County Example.

Michigan Planning Guidebook: for Citizens and Local Officials

This Extension publication (May 2008) is a general overview of zoning in Michigan covering basic zoning activities, the three zoning functions, roles and responsibilities of different boards and officials, procedural elements, special land uses, planned unit developments, site plans, amending and adopting zoning, enforcement, open space zoning, purchase of development rights, and more. It is written to reflect the requirements of the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act of 2006.

Michigan Planning Guidebook: for Citizens and Local Officials