Asparagus Miner Facts (E3143)

The asparagus miner was introduced into North America from Europe, and was first found along the northeast coast of the United States in 1869.

Introduction:

The asparagus miner was introduced into North America from Europe, and was first found along the northeast coast of the United States in 1869. This pest has two full generations per growing season in Michigan (Tuell & Hausbeck, 2008), and asparagus is its only known host (Chittenden, 1898). The asparagus miner has been recorded in every county in Michigan where there is commercial asparagus production, including Mason, Oceana, Van Buren, Allegan and Cass counties (see Figure 1). This factsheet provides general information on the biology of the asparagus miner and options for its management.

Life History and Life Cycle:

In Michigan, asparagus miners overwinter as pupae in mined asparagus stem debris (Lampert, Cress, & Haynes, 1984). Two complete generations take place in Michigan in each growing season (Lampert et al., 1984; Tuell & Hausbeck, 2008). Adult flies normally emerge in late May to early June, and reach their first peak abundance around mid-June (see figure on page 3). Shortly after emerging, the adults mate and the females lay eggs near the base of asparagus stems, either right above or just below the soil surface.

 

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