Worksite Health Infrastructure Best Practices

How to use this page: Once you complete the Designing Healthier Environments at Work (DHEW) assessment, you will receive a print off that lists the best practices in order of achieving (first), partially achieving (second), and not achieving (third). The order will be different for each worksite based on the answers to the assessment.

Notice also that the DHEW print out arranges best practices for Worksite Health Infrastructure by the subtopic areas Organization/Policy, Understanding Employee Needs/Interest, Health Programming/Activities, and Evaluation. The best practices on this page are also arranged by these subtopics and are then arranged alphabetically for ease of location. Following each best practice you will find resources that will help you to reach that best practice.

 

Organization/Policy

 

“Establish a wellness committee that meets at least quarterly, is representative of the workforce, and that is actively involved in establishing health promotion policies, garnering management support, and/or planning and implementing health promotion programming.”

Having a committee that is representative of all parts of the organization is very important. Try to get people from all levels of employment, including leadership, to be a part of the committee.

 

Wellness Committee Guide

Summary: This brief PDF outlines steps for starting a wellness committee.

Source: California Fit Business Toolkit

Access: www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Documents/CFBK-StartingWellnessCommittee.pdf

 

 

Committee Guide

Summary: This PDF is a very comprehensive resource which outlines how to establish a worksite health promotion committee, outlines for what to cover at six meetings over a year span, and additional resources in the Appendix section. We should emphasize the Eat Smart and Move More sections out of the four listed since this most closely relates to SNAP.

Source: North Carolina Eat Smart Move More Toolkit

Access: http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/CommitteeGuide/CommitteeGuide.html

 

 

“Have a budget or receive dedicated funding for worksite health promotion.”

If an organization has dedicated money to put towards worksite health promotion, see sample budgets below. Many organizations will not have the funding to put towards worksite health promotion. See below for possible funding opportunities.

 

Sample Budget

Summary: This PDF provides a line item budget for a worksite health promotion program.

Source: Centers for Disease Control’s National Healthy Worksite Program

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/BudgetTemplate.pdf

 

 

Health Innovation Grants Webpage

Title: Health Innovation Grants Webpage

Summary: Web based information about applying to the Health Innovation Grants from MDHHS.

Source: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

Access: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,4612,7-132-63157_3149-360971—,00.html

 

 

Finding Opportunities for Work Force Health Promotion

Summary: Web-based list of resources which includes sources for potential funding and information on grant writing.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign/funding.htm

 

“Identify and if necessary, empower employee “influencers” to actively engage them in promoting worksite health promotion programs.”

Create a wellness committee that includes representatives that are excited about the initiative and can be a champion. A champion interacts with other employees to get them involved and is often the “go-to” for organizational questions. This will include various employee levels and geographic areas. See resources below to establish a committee.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Leadership Support Webpage

Summary: Webpage about basic leadership support. Helpful for providing background information.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/leadership.html

 

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Governance Structure and Management Webpage

Summary: Webpage about management roles in a successful worksite health promotion program. Helpful for providing background information.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/structure.html

 

 

COMMITTEE GUIDES

 

Wellness Committee Guide

Summary: This brief PDF outlines steps for starting a wellness committee.

Source: California Fit Business Toolkit

Access: www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Documents/CFBK-StartingWellnessCommittee.pdf

 

 

Committee Guide

Summary: This PDF is a very comprehensive resource which outlines how to establish a worksite health promotion committee, outlines for what to cover at six meetings over a year span, and additional resources in the Appendix section. We should emphasize the Eat Smart and Move More sections out of the four listed since this most closely relates to SNAP.

Source: North Carolina Eat Smart Move More Toolkit

Access: http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/CommitteeGuide/CommitteeGuide.html

 

 

Program Design

Summary: Web link to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Program Design information.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign//index.htm

 

 

TOOLS/RESOURCES

 

Worksite Wellness Committee Recruitment Letter

Summary: Sample committee recruitment letter that can be used as a template for worksites.

Source: Tufts Health Plan

Access:http://www.tuftshealthplan.com/employers/health/pdfs/sample_wellness_committee_recruitment_letter.pdf

 

 

Kicking Off Employee Wellness

Summary: A PDF that is useful for collecting initial ideas after the first wellness committee meeting.

Source: Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Access: https://www.healthiergeneration.org/_asset/ytq6t1/12-5923_KickingOffEW.pdf

 

 

Sample Worksite Health Team Charter

Summary: A PDF that provides a sample health team charter including mission statement, operating principals, methods/structure, functional roles, expectations of officers, expectations of team members, team communication, decision making procedures, and potential subcommittees.

Source: National Healthy Worksite

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/WellnessCommitteeCharter.pdf

 

 

Sample Wellness Coordinator Job Description

Summary: While hiring a Wellness Coordinator is not necessary, it may be desirable to some workplaces. This PDF provides a job description for a Wellness Coordinator.

Source: MI Health Tools

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/CoordinatorPDExample.pdf

 

 

Sample Budget

Summary: This PDF provides a line item budget for a worksite health promotion program.

Source: Centers for Disease Control’s National Healthy Worksite Program

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/BudgetTemplate.pdf

 

 

“Implement policies that allow for flex time schedules around work duties to enable attendance at work-sponsored health promotion activities /programs scheduled during work hours.”

Policies

Summary: Webpage with Center for Disease Control and Prevention guide to general policy information for the Healthy Worksite Initiative.

Source: CDC Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/policy/index.htm

 

Flex Time/Physical Activity Opportunities Policy

Summary: PDF which provides examples of flex time policies.

Source: Department of Human Services Oregon Public Health Division

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/FlextimePolicy.pdf

 

 

“Include worksite health promotion implementation in the job description of either a full time person dedicated to this job or a part time person who does this work either as a part time employee or in conjunction with other job functions.”

While this may not be feasible in every worksite, it can be helpful to review a sample Wellness Coordinator Job Description in case they wish to consider posting a position. A job description can also be helpful for volunteer positions or the committee. This can help the committee know what they are expected to do as a champion of worksite health promotion.

 

Sample Wellness Coordinator Job Description

Summary: While hiring a Wellness Coordinator is not necessary, it may be desirable to some workplaces. This PDF provides a job description for a Wellness Coordinator.

Source: MI Health Tools

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/CoordinatorPDExample.pdf

 

 

“Obtain commitment and support of worksite health promotion from all levels of managements, including management participation in activities, communications sent to employees from senior leaders, support of performance objectives related to healthy workforce, and program ownership at all staff levels.”

By participating in this worksite health promotion initiative, a business is taking the first step to demonstrate organizational commitment and support of worksite health promotion! The following resources will help make the case for why worksite health promotion is important at all levels of management. These materials can help you recruit worksites and also get upper management on board!

Making the Case for Worksite Wellness Slides

Summary: A slideshow geared for management to help employers understand the value of worksite wellness initiatives.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/TrAiNiNgMaNuAl_MakingTheCase09-10-12.pdf

References for slides: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/TrAiNiNgMaNuAl_ReferenceList09-10-12.pdf

 

 

Work Matters for Health

Summary: A PDF that  is geared  for management that explains how health impacts work, human and economic costs for employment-related health problems, and strategies for improving health by making workplaces healthier.

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Access: www.commissiononhealth.org/PDF/0e8ca13d-6fb8-451d-bac8-7d15343aacff/Issue%20Brief%204%20Dec%2008%20-%20Work%20and%20Health.pdf

 

 

Physical Inactivity Calculator

Summary: This quantifies the cost of physical inactivity. You need the following information: your state, number of adults, number of working adults, percentage of adults 65 years and older, and median per capita salary of workforce.

Source: East Carolina University 

Access:  http://www2.ecu.edu/HHP/picostcalc/

 

Return on Investment (ROI) Calculator

Summary:  This projects the impact of evidence-based programs on health care costs, productivity, and absenteeism. Enter the annual health care costs, annual health care cost percent increase, number of employees, information on how many employees are obese and smokers if desired (otherwise it will generate an average number).

Source: Well Steps

Access: https://www.wellsteps.com/roi/resources_tools_roi_cal_health.php

 

Employer Health Asset Management: A Roadmap for Improving the Health of Your Employees and Your Organization 

Summary: This explains the cost benefits of promoting a healthy workforce beyond direct financial benefits, including employee morale.

Source: Change Accent Work Group

Access: https://www.ihpm.org/pdf/EmployerHealthAssetManagementRoadmap.pdf‚Äč

 

 

“Provide access to an Employee Assistance Program for employees.”

Refer to the following resource for general information on Employee Assistance Programs. Employee Assistance Programs help employees deal with personal issues and often involve counseling and referral services.

 

Employee Assistance Programs for a New Generation of Employees

Summary: A PDF with overview of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs).

Source: US Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy guide

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/EAP.pdf

 

 

“Set annual organizational objectives for worksite health promotion.”

The first step to improving worksite health promotion is to form a health champion committee if one does not exist. This committee typically includes two to eight representatives from the worksite. It is best to include representatives from all geographic locations and levels of employees.  Refer to resources below. Then, the committee can help guide objectives that align with the overall goals of the worksite. If a committee already exists, connect with them to reenergize the team.

 

GENERAL INFO

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Leadership Support Webpage

Summary: Webpage about basic leadership support. Helpful for providing background information.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/leadership.html

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Governance Structure and Management Webpage

Summary: Webpage about management roles in a successful worksite health promotion program. Helpful for providing background information.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/structure.html

 

 

COMMITTEE GUIDES

Wellness Committee Guide

Summary: This brief PDF outlines steps for starting a wellness committee.

Source: California Fit Business Toolkit

Access: www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Documents/CFBK-StartingWellnessCommittee.pdf

 

 

Committee Guide

Summary: This PDF is a very comprehensive resource which outlines how to establish a worksite health promotion committee, outlines for what to cover at six meetings over a year span, and additional resources in the Appendix section. We should emphasize the Eat Smart and Move More sections out of the four listed since this most closely relates to SNAP.

Source: North Carolina Eat Smart Move More Toolkit

Access: http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/CommitteeGuide/CommitteeGuide.html

 

 

Program Design

Summary: Web link to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Program Design information.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign//index.htm

 

 

TOOLS/RESOURCES

Worksite Wellness Committee Recruitment Letter

Summary: Sample committee recruitment letter that can be used as a template for worksites.

Source: Tufts Health Plan

Access:http://www.tuftshealthplan.com/employers/health/pdfs/sample_wellness_committee_recruitment_letter.pdf

 

 

Kicking off Employee Wellness

Summary: A PDF that is useful for collecting initial ideas after the first wellness committee meeting.

Source: Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Access: https://www.healthiergeneration.org/_asset/ytq6t1/12-5923_KickingOffEW.pdf

 

 

Sample Worksite Health Team Charter

Summary: A PDF that provides a sample health team charter including mission statement, operating principals, methods/structure, functional roles, expectations of officers, expectations of team members, team communication, decision making procedures, and potential subcommittees.

Source: National Healthy Worksite

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/WellnessCommitteeCharter.pdf

 

 

Sample Wellness Coordinator Job Description

Summary: While hiring a Wellness Coordinator is not necessary, it may be desirable to some workplaces. This PDF provides a job description for a Wellness Coordinator.

Source: MI Health Tools

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/CoordinatorPDExample.pdf

 

 

Sample Budget

Summary: This PDF provides a line item budget for a worksite health promotion program.

Source: Centers for Disease Control’s National Healthy Worksite Program

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/BudgetTemplate.pdf

 

“Support breastfeeding mothers by implementing and enforcing a policy or written procedure related to breastfeeding support, providing a private location to express breast milk, and allowing reasonable break time for employees to express breast milk.”

Some organizations will have space to dedicate to breastfeed efforts but many will not. Refer to policy resource below for ideas on accommodating breastfeeding mothers in the workplace.  The Center for Disease Control and Prevention information is more general regarding an overview of all policies, others are more specific to breastfeeding.  

Policies Webpage

Summary: Webpage with Center for Disease Control and Prevention guide to general policy information for the Healthy Worksite Initiative. Includes policies in federal workplaces which can be used as a guide for a worksite writing their own policies. 

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/policy/index.htm

 

 

Breastfeeding Policy

Summary: PDF which provides examples of breastfeeding policies.

Source: New York State Department of Health

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/BFPolicyExample.pdf

 

Break Time Requirement for Nursing Mothers Policy Fact Sheet

Summary: Fact Sheet for break time for nursing mothers under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Source: US Department of Labor

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/whdfs73.pdf

 

 

Understanding Employee Needs/Interests

“Conduct employee interest surveys at least once annually to find out what employee needs and interests related to their health.”

The DHEW has a needs assessment available for organizations to use. Some worksites might want to create their own needs assessment survey if they are interested in other topics not included in the DHEW survey. The resources below will guide them through this process.

Designing Healthy Environments at Work Assessment (DHEW) 

Summary: The DHEW is the main evaluation tool for MSUE coaches to use as a pre and post survey to measure our impact. It is easiest for worksites to utilize the print version to answer the questions and then set up an account and input the information onto the web version.

Source: Michigan Wellness Council

Print Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/DHEW_printversion.pdf

Online Form Access: http://www.michiganwellnesscouncil.org/resource/designing-healthy-environments-at-work-assessment-dhew/

DHEW Assessment Instruction Guide: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/DHEW_Instructions.pdf

 

 

Employee Interest Survey

Summary: This employee interest survey provides questions related to the DHEW assessment and allows for employers to distribute these surveys via email.

Source: Michigan Wellness Council

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/EIS_PrintVersion.pdf

DHEW Employee Interest Survey Instruction Guide: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/EIS_Instructions.pdf

 

Borrego Springs Unified School District Worksite Wellness Individual Interest Survey

Summary: A PDF survey created for the Borrego Springs Unified School District. Questions could be modified to create a customized assessment.

Source: Directors of Health Promotion and Education

Access: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.dhpe.org/resource/group/75a95e00-448d-41c5-8226-0d20f29787de/Downloadable_Materials/InterestHabits5.pdf

 

“Offer health risk appraisals that include individualized feedback and health education to address risks through written reports, letters, or personal counseling.”

Health Risk Appraisals collect information from individuals regarding risk factors for health issues and provide feedback on health improvement. While Health Risk Appraisals are out of the scope of SNAP-Ed, this resource from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention can be utilized if the worksite wants to pursue this themselves. Worksites can also check with health insurance providers, vendors, online, etc.

Health Risk Appraisals General Information and Checklist for Planning Employee Health Risk Appraisal Implementation

Summary: A webpage from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention covering an overview of Health Risk Appraisals including considerations for use in the workplace, what Health Risk Appraisals are, reasons why a workplace may opt to participate in a , and important things to consider including ethics.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign/health_risk_appraisals.htm

 

 

Health Programming/Activities

“Make health promotion activities and programs available to family members.”

The health of an employee also involves the health of family members. The resource below can provide worksites with ideas for how to involve family member in a worksite health promotion initiative.

8 Ways to Involve Family Members

Summary: PDF that includes ideas for ways to involve family members.

Source: Health Enhancement Systems

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/FamilyEngagement.pdf

 

 

“Offer health promotion activities, education programs and/or behavior changes programs aimed at involving your entire workforce by addressing employee needs and interests. These can be offered onsite or through working with community resources that serve your area.”

These resources provide suggestions for activities and education programs to enhance health programming activities.

 

MSU Extension Nutrition and Physical Activity Programs  

Summary: A list of classes offered for free to SNAP eligible audiences. My Way to Wellness is offered completely online for free to SNAP eligible participants.

Source: MSU Extension

Access: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/topic/programs/food_health

 

 

Skyscraper Climb from Texas

Summary: A challenge activity to encourage stair use. 

Source: Texas Department of State Health Services

Access: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/wellness/worksiteresources.shtm

 

 

Maintain No Gain from Texas

Summary: A weight maintenance program for the holiday season.

Source: Texas Department of State Health Services

Access: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/wellness/worksiteresources.shtm

 

 

Lighten Up Texas

Summary: An 8 week weight loss challenge program.

Source: Texas Department of State Health Services

Access: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/wellness/worksiteresources.shtm

 

 

Five a Day – Five a Week

Summary: Encourages participants to eat five servings of fruits and veggies a day, do minimum of 30 min PA per day 5 days a week, do five weekly activities to reduce stress.

Source: Texas Department of State Health Services

Access: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/wellness/worksiteresources.shtm

 

 

Fruit and Vegetables Challenge

Summary: A month long challenge where employees score points by eating fruits and vegetables.

Source: Eat Smart Move More North Carolina

Access: http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/FruitsAndVeggiesChallenge/FruitsAndVeggiesChallenge.html

 

 

Work Well North Carolina Ten-Minute Challenge

Summary: A challenge designed to take place over 8 weeks. Participants earn points each time they practice a 10 minute tip.

Source: Work Well North Carolina

Access:http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/TenMinuteChallenge/Texts/10MinChallengeOverview.pdf

 

 

“Promote and market health promotion to employees in a variety of ways including establishing a brand identity for the program, providing information about the program as a standard part of new employee orientation, regularly distributing emails and/or print materials about the program, posting of information related to the program in places where employees typically see/access information, having a website/web page dedicated to health promotion information.”

A mixed communication model may be the most successful. Remember that all people learn and absorb information differently. Start by choosing one or two options and see how successful they are. You might need to try a few different communication strategies. Resources can help with informing employees about the program.

 

Simply Put

Summary: General communication guide from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Focuses on creating health promotional materials based on technical information that are easy for the audience to understand.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/simply_put.pdf

 

Workplace Health Promotion: Communications Webpage

Summary: A webpage with general communications information for a workplace in regards to health programs.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/communications.html

 

 

Gateway to Health Communication and Social Marketing Practice: Tools and Templates

Summary: A webpage with general communications information that includes templates for marketing materials and tips to make outreach successful.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/ToolsTemplates/

 

 

Social Marketing Basics

Summary: PDF that explains social marketing basics and includes scenarios to help employers market their health program.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/socialmarketing/training/pdf/course/Basics.pdf

 

 

“Routinely (at least four times per year) engage in community health promotion activities and support employee participation and volunteer efforts. Examples include co-sponsored charity walks, health coalitions, community and school vegetable gardens.”

Connect with local community resources such as the Health Department, School, Hospital, Extension office, community foundation, etc.

 

National Health Observances Webpage

Summary: A website with a list of special health observances dedicated to raising awareness about important health topics.

Source: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Access: http://healthfinder.gov/NHO/

 

 

Employee Well Being Month

Summary: Takes place in June and spotlights the workplace’s role in encouraging health among employees.

Access: http://employeewellbeingmonth.com/

 

 

Food Day

Summary: Occurs on October 24. Meant to inspire Americans to change their diets and our food polices. The website has a search section to find food day events near you.

Source: Center for Science in the Public Interest

Access: http://www.foodday.org/splash_page?splash=1

 

 

National Nutrition Month

Summary: A nutrition education campaign that takes place in March and is hosted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Encourages healthy eating and physical activity habits.

Source: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Access: www.nationalnutritionmonth.org/

 

 

National Bike Month

Summary: Takes place in May and is sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists.

Source: League of American Wheelmen, Inc.

Access: http://bikeleague.org/bikemonth

 

 

Fruits and Veggies – More Matters Month Toolkit

Summary: Occurs in September and raises awareness about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services

Access: http://healthfinder.gov/nho/SeptemberToolkit2.aspx

 

 

National Physical Fitness and Sports Month Toolkit

Summary: Occurs in May and raises awareness about the importance of physical activity.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services

Access: http://healthfinder.gov/nho/MayToolkit.aspx

 

 

“Share with all employees the overall worksite health objectives and the goals for specific programs and activities and then regularly communicate progress toward those objectives and goals.”

An informed employee and worksite will often increase engagement. Sharing the objectives, goals, activities, and progress will assist in marketing the worksite health promotion program.  It is important to understand health information privacy and to make sure that specific health information for an individual person is never shared. All results should be combined and only shared for the entire worksite in general. Check with your HR guidelines to ensure privacy is protected.     

 

Understanding Health Information Privacy Webpage

Summary: This webpage contains information about the rules regarding health information privacy.

Source: US Department of Health and Human Services

Access: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/index.html

 

                         

“Tailor worksite health promotion programs and education materials to employees with consideration for language, literacy level, culture and readiness to change.”

The culture of a worksite is shaped by various aspects including the employees, management, organizational goals, location, benefits, and the availability of food and physical activity options.  Communications resources are included to meet the needs of the audience. Employee readiness to change often occurs in stages including pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance.

 

Physical Activity Stage of Change: Assessment Tool

Summary: This describes the adult stages of change model in the context of physical activity.

Source: Exercise and Sports Science Australia

Access: http://exerciseismedicine.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Physical-activity-stage-of-change-assessment-tool.pdf

 

 

SMOG Readability Formula

Summary: The SMOG readability formula is useful to ensure materials are meeting the target audience. The average US adult reads at a 7th grade reading level. Remember, this means that 50% are below that average. Try to make materials at a 6th grade reading level to ensure that more people can enjoy the materials you make! This website contains a calculator to paste word samples and determine the readability.

Source: Readability Formulas

Access: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

 

 

Workplace Health Promotion: Communications Webpage

Summary: A webpage with general communications information for a workplace in regards to health programs.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/planning/communications.html

 

 

Simply Put

Summary: General communication guide from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Focuses on creating health promotional materials based on technical information that are easy for the audience to understand.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/simply_put.pdf

 

 

Gateway to Health Communication and Social Marketing Practice: Tools and Templates

Summary: A webpage with general communications information that includes templates for marketing materials and tips to make outreach successful.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/ToolsTemplates/

 

 

Social Marketing Basics

Summary: PDF that explains social marketing basics and includes scenarios to help employers market their health program.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/socialmarketing/training/pdf/course/Basics.pdf

 

 

“Utilize incentives combined with other strategies to encourage participation in health promotion programs. Examples include gift certificates, cash, reduced health insurance premiums, employee recognition, product or service discounts, team activities, walking competitions.”

Incentives are a great way to encourage participation in worksite health promotion programs, as well as kicking off new efforts. The following resources are to help with finding incentives and other funding opportunities for worksite health promotion. 

 

Employee Wellness Incentives

Summary: List of potential incentives for worksite health programs.

Source: Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Access: https://www.healthiergeneration.org/_asset/jd3ppl/13-6195_EWIncentives.pdf

 

 

Wellness Incentive

Source: The School District of Osceola County

Summary: Example of a cash wellness incentive (deposited to health care flex spending account) from Osceola County, FL.

Access: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.dhpe.org/resource/group/75a95e00-448d-41c5-8226-0d20f29787de/Downloadable_Materials/Implement-Osceola.pdf

 

 

Funding Opportunities for Work Force Health Promotion

Summary: Web-based list of resources which includes sources for potential funding and information on grant writing.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign/funding.htm

 

 

Health Innovation Grants Webpage

Summary: Web based information about applying to the Health Innovation Grants from MDHHS.

Source: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

Access: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,4612,7-132-63157_3149-360971—,00.html

 

 

Evaluation

“Conduct ongoing evaluation of your health promotion activities using multiple data sources to obtain a complete picture. Suggested data sources include employee feedback and/or employee culture surveys; observation data on employee health behaviors during the work day (physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco use); participation data for programs and events; tracking of changes in employee absences, medical claims, risk factors, productivity.”

It’s important to continuously evaluate programs, policies, and activities for any worksite health promotion program to make sure if meets the needs of the employees, worksite, and stakeholders. Evaluation resources can be found below.

 

Designing Healthy Environments at Work Assessment (DHEW) 

Summary: The DHEW will be utilized by MSUE Coaches to evaluate change in the workplace. Worksites can fill out the print version then complete the web based version.

Source: Michigan Wellness Council

Print Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/DHEW_printversion.pdf

Online Form Access: http://www.michiganwellnesscouncil.org/resource/designing-healthy-environments-at-work-assessment-dhew/

 

 

Evaluation Resources

Summary: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Website with links to evaluation resources and award opportunities.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Healthier Worksite Initiative

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/programdesign/evaluation.htm

 

 

Workplace Health Promotion: Evaluation

Summary: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Website with general overview of evaluation. Specific links to nutrition and physical activity are included.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Access: http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/evaluation/index.html

 

 

Employee Feedback Survey

Summary: A survey used to gather feedback of employer workplace health programs. This is available in the DHEW online system.

Source: Michigan Wellness Council

Access: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/EFS_PrintVersion.pdf

DHEW Employee Feedback Survey Instruction Guide: http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/documents/EFS_Instructions.pdf

 

 

Systematically Increasing Participation Checklist

Summary: Information is free, but email address must be entered to access information. Sample of ways to increase participation in programs.

Source: WELCOA

Access: https://www.welcoa.org/resources/systematically-increasing-participation-checklist/

 

 

Little Things Make a Big Difference Questionnaire – Guide for increasing participation and generating enthusiasm

Summary: Information is free, but email address must be entered to access information. Sample of ways to increase participation in programs.

Source: WELCOA

Access: https://www.welcoa.org/resources/little-things-make-big-difference-questionnaire/