When does misplacing our keys turn into a life long issue?

Signs of of memory loss and Alzheimers.

As we get older we experience changes that occur both physically and mentally. We may at times misplace keys or forget how to organize a shopping list, but there are instances where these random events may affect daily activities. If a person begins to experience memory loss, forgetting familiar faces and forgetting how to find their way home, it is important to know that these occurrences are not always a natural part of the aging process. There is a complied list of warning signs recommended by Michigan State University Extension that a person and family members use to assist them in determining if they ought to seek advice from a licensed professional.

Mayo Clinic list a few of those signs, which include:

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life, forgetting important event dates or relying on memory aids such as post-it notes.
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems, such as developing a budget, unable to follow a well known family recipe or how to balance a check book.
  • Confusion with time or place. A person may forget how to get home from shopping at the mall, may not remember how to play a favorite card game or may be confused as to the current season it may be.
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing such as calling an object by another name, not remembering what the conversation was about, being unable to find the right word or forgetting vocabulary words often used.

For a complete list of The 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimers please view the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Loss & 10 Early Signs of Alzheimer’s | Alzheimer’s Association website. This website has information to assist families in learning more about Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss expected with aging, and signs of when to seek additional assistance from health professionals.

For more information on Alzheimers visit: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/topics/alzheimers-basics



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