Michigan grown produce is still available

Michigan consumers will be able to enjoy Michigan grown fruits and vegetables, in spite of the spring weather.

On the heels of a mild winter, spring roared in with higher than normal temperatures in March and then severe frosts threw a devastating punch in April. Unfortunately, this unusual weather has caused a major shortage of Michigan grown tree fruit, such as apples, peaches and sweet cherries. While the crop loss varies region to region or even county to county, consumers who make it their personal mission to find a Michigan grown apple or peach will, nevertheless, enjoy the hunt. Granted, you may have to drive a little farther and pay a little more but it will be worth the effort when you bite into that crisp and juicy Michigan apple.

More types of vegetables and fruits are grown on Michigan farms than most states in the country. Because of this diversity, consumers will be able to purchase and enjoy farm-fresh produce even with the unusual weather. Many vegetables and fruits have been relatively unaffected, offering consumers a choice at the local grocery store, farmer’s market or roadside farm stand. However, many crops are approximately two weeks ahead of their “normal” harvest dates, so keep this in mind. It will be very important to keep a watchful eye on fresh produce that is normally only available for a few weeks, such as sugar peas, strawberries and nectarines.

A number of resources are available to help consumers make timely fresh produce purchases. The Michigan Availability Guide can help consumers purchase Michigan grown fruits and vegetables when they are at their peak flavor and freshness. The easy to read chart shows a wide range of availability because the season varies slightly from year to year and from one region of the state to another. It’s not exact, but the guide is a practical tool that consumers can use to enjoy Michigan’s bountiful fruits and vegetables when they’re at their best.

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