Summer safety part 1: Hydration

Keep kids safe this summer by avoiding heat-related illnesses and keeping them hydrated.

Summer safety part 1: Hydration

Summer is finally here and after a long winter, it’s easy to forget how important it is to keep our kids safe in the summer. Summer brings about fun in the sun, picnics, days at the beach and so many more fun and relaxing opportunities for friends and families to gather. Keep those summer activities fun by keeping kids safe. In this series of articles, we will explore some safety issues that may arise during the summer and how to avoid the downfalls associated with them. This article will explore hydration in children.

It’s easy for kids to want to be out in the sun in warm weather after a long winter. However, as good as the sun may feel, it can also leave kids feeling drained when the temperatures and humidity rise. Our bodies tend to naturally cool themselves, but sometimes it can be hard for kid’s bodies to keep up with the warmth of the weather. Kids may experience heat-related illnesses such as cramps, exhaustion or even heatstroke. For more information about these heat-related illnesses, read the article “Heat Illness” from KidsHealth.org.

It’s important to keep kids hydrated in the summer heat. The Beverage Institute for Health and Wellness suggests that all beverages, including water, milk, juice and other fluids, can help meet a child’s hydration needs. The U.S. Institute of Medicine suggests the following guidelines to keeping kids hydrated:

  • 4-8 years of age: 7.5 cups of fluid per day
  • 9-13 years of age: 10 cups of fluid per day
  • 14-18 years of age females: 10 cups of fluid per day
  • 14-18 years of age males: 14 cups of fluid per day

Michigan State University Extension also provides resources for staying hydrated. See the following articles:

Remember to keep your kids safe this summer by avoiding heat-related illnesses and keeping them hydrated.

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