Specialty crop and minor-use pesticide prioritization set for 2016 by IR-4

Participants at the 2015 IR-4 Food Use and Biopesticide Workshop identified the most important research projects for the 2016 IR-4 food-use research program.

The IR-4 Project (Interregional Research Project No.4) is to ensure that safe and effective pest management solutions are available for growers of specialty crops and for minor uses. Specialty crop research needs are prioritized each year during a national workshop since resources are limited.

Research priority A’s for the year 2016 field program for fruits, vegetables, nuts, field and oil crops, herbs and other miscellaneous crops in the United States and Canada were selected at the Food Use and Biopesticide Workshop held Sept. 22-24, 2015, in Chicago, Illinois. More than 120 people attended the two and half day meeting: specialty crop researchers, extension specialists, representatives of commodity and industry groups across the country, and personnel from EPA, USDA, IR-4 plus the AAFC (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada that conducts Canadian counterpart of minor use program) and PMRA (Pest Management Regulatory Agency, i.e., Canadian counterpart of U.S. EPA). For Michigan’s fruit and vegetable interest, the workshop was attended by Michigan State University’s Bernard ZandstraSatoru MiyazakiJohn Wise, Annemiek Schilder, Mary Hausbeck, Rufus Isaacs, Matt Grieshop, Lynnae Jess and Tony VanWoerkom. Representing Michigan grower’s group was Dave Trinka (blueberry).

The prioritization process focused on the most critical pest management needs from all disciplines for each commodity. Participants were provided with a list of pesticides “nominated” with desired priority of A, B or C prior to the food-use workshop. As a group, they ranked products based on availability and efficacy of alternative pest management tools (including ongoing projects for the same need and resistance management), damage potential of target pests, performance and crop safety of the chemical in managing the target pests, compatibility of the proposed chemical candidate with integrated pest management, uses currently covered by Section 18 emergency exemptions and harmonization implications due to lack of international MRLs (Maximum Residue Limits).

Based on projected budget appropriations for IR-4 this year, only 40 projects – down from 43 in 2014 – throughout the disciplines were assigned “A” priorities. An “A” priority guarantees IR-4 to begin the field residue program during the following season and complete it within 30 months. The timeline will be shortened when IR-4 joins the company’s petition submission schedule with the expectation that a complete data package be submitted to the EPA in 16-24 months.

In addition to the above projects that require pesticide residue analysis under GLP, 5 “H+” (high priority plus) efficacy/crop safety projects were selected because potential registrants want to see the data first before IR-4 conducts full residue studies, or IR-4 needs to screen pest control products for new pests, the PPWS (pest problems without solution) projects.

Twenty-four projects important for Michigan were assigned A priorities. In addition, four candidate H+ projects for Michigan growers were identified (see tables below). Any “B” priority projects must be upgraded to A priority either by an Priority Upgrade Proposal (PUP) or by regional upgrade if applicable. Biopesticides priorities of Michigan interest are also identified. The following new candidate priority “A” projects listed are preliminary until affirmed at the IR-4 national planning meeting on Oct. 27-28, 2015. A complete listing can be found on the IR-4 website.

Priority “A” projects for Michigan fruits and vegetables

Group

Commodity

Chemical

Reasons for need

01AB

Ginseng

Benzovindiflupyr + Difenoconazole

Alternaria

01CD

Sweet potato

Difenoconazole

Root rot

01CD

Sweet potato

Fluridone

Amaranthus, such as palmer amaranth

03-07A

Onion (dry bulb)

Bentazon

Yellow nutsedge

06C

Pea (dry)

Ethaboxam (V-10208)

Aphanomyces in dried/field peas, via seed treatment

08-10A

Tomato (GH)

Afidopyropen

Aphids and psyllids

08-10BC

Pepper (GH)

Afidopyropen

Aphids and psyllids

09A

Cantaloupe

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, southern red mite

09B

Cucumber

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, southern red mite

09B

Cucumber (GH)

Afidopyropen

Aphids and psyllids

09B

Squash (summer)

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, southern red mite

12-12A

Cherry

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, European red mite

12-12B

Peach

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, European red mite

12-12C

Plum

Cyflumetofen

Twospotted spider mite, European red mite

13-07B

Blueberry

Cyflumetofen

Southern red mite, two-spotted spider mite

13-07B

Blueberry

Fth 545

Alternaria fruit rot, mummy berry, botrytis blossom blight and fruit rot

13-07G

Strawberry

Oxathiapiprolin

Phytophthora species (leather rot, red stele, crown rot); Pythium (black root root)

13-07G

Strawberry (GH)

Afidopyropen

Aphids; resistance management

20A

Canola

Clomazone

Winter annuals

20B

Sunflower

Flupyradifurone (BYI 02960)

Whiteflies, aphids, plant bugs, other piercing/sucking pests

99

Asparagus

Flupyradifurone (BYI 02960)

European asparagus aphid

99

Hops

Clofentezine

Tetranychid spider mites, mainly t. Urticae

99

Hops

Oxathiapiprolin

Downy mildew (pseudoperonospora humuli)

99

Mint

Linuron

Redroot pigweed, kochia, rattail fescue, other weeds

 

High priority needs for efficacy/crop safety projects for Michigan fruits and vegetables

Group

Commodity

Chemical

Reasons for need

01AB

Carrot

Bicyclopyrone

Annual grasses, redroot pigweed, common ragweed

01CD

Sweet potato

Fluazinam

Rhizopus root rot; also from me-too request, has the potential to be effective against tuber decay on true yam and corm rot in arracacha:08/15

06ABC

Bean (lima,snap, cowpea)

Insecticide

Cowpea curculio

13-07G

Strawberry

Indoxacarb

Leafroller, sap beetle, clipper, plant bug (including lygus)

 

High priority candidate biopesticide projects for Michigan fruits, vegetables and organic production

Priority

Fruit

Vegetables

Organic

#1

Spotted wing drosophila/All crops (Also organic)

Bacterial Diseases Fruiting vegetables (filed and GH)

Fire blight (Erwinia amylovos)/Organic pome fruit

#2

Whitefly, aphid, Psyllids/GH tomato; and mites, thrips, aphids and whiteflies/vegetables

Diabrotica spp./Organic vegetables

#3

Stem gall wasp/Blueberry

Downy mildew/Basil (field and GH) and cucurbits

Cercospora and Cladosporium leaf spot/Organic leafy greens (spinach, chard)

#4

Botrytis/Strawberry, raspberry

Pepino mosaic virus/Tomato (GH)

Monillinia corymbosum (mummy berry disease/Organic Blueberry (bushberry)

 Drs. Wise and Zandstra’s work is funded in part by MSU’s AgBioResearch.

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