Responding to hate

The Southern Law Poverty Center and the Anti-Defamation League have released resources to address and respond to hate, bigotry, racism and anti-Semitism.

Two of our nation’s leading civil rights/human relations organizations, the Southern Law Poverty Center and the Anti-Defamation League have released resources to address and respond to hate, bigotry, racism and anti-Semitism.

Recent events in Charlottesville, VA, and the spike in incidents of hate, hate speech and violence have affected individuals and communities across America, including in Michigan. Groups and individuals are looking for intentional ways to address these situations, document or prosecute the perpetrators and build more environments that are inclusive for all.

Ten Ways to Fight Hate a publication from the Southern Law Poverty Center provides ten ways that community groups and individuals can fight hate. A sampling of the ten principles highlighted in this publication include:

  • Join Forces – Reach out and build diverse coalitions and partnerships across race, gender, age and other differences, including allies. Work together to include diverse voices and ideas to move your work forward.
  • Support the Victims – Hate affects all of us and the victims of hate are particularly vulnerable. If needed, help victims navigate systems to report hate incidents. Show you care and support victims with care and comfort.
  • Educate Yourself - Effective community efforts are informed efforts. Do your homework and use the opportunity to help educate others, especially about the difference between a hate crime and a bias incident.
  • Dig Deeper – All of us are susceptible to supporting bias, stereotypes and other hurtful ideas, language and behaviors across differences. Our work is to look within ourselves and with others to identify and address acts of intolerance in our homes, workplaces and communities.

Responding to Hate a publication from the Anti-Defamation League provides information and resources for responding to hate. Included in this publication is:

  • A definition of a hate crime
  • How and why to report a hate crime to authorities and civil rights organizations
  • What is unlawful discrimination
  • How to respond to unlawful discrimination
  • What is a hate incident and how to respond to it

Working together across our differences in our homes, spiritual communities, workplaces and other institutions to stand up against hate and other violence can help move us all toward greater acceptance and our American values of liberty and justice for all.

Michigan State University Extension provides additional resources focused on diversity, equity and inclusion.

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