Public Act 178 is important to all Michigan residents

What does Public Act 178, effective October 1, mean for Michigan residents? It means Michigan’s Food Law of 2000 is updated to more accurately reflect changes made at the federal level and to improve outdated areas of Michigan’s law.

On June 10 2012, Gov. Rick Snyder signed Public Act 178 into law. What does that mean for Michigan residents? It means Michigan’s Food Law of 2000 is updated to more accurately reflect changes made at the federal level and to improve outdated areas of Michigan’s food laws.

Michigan’s updated food law, effective October 1, assures Michigan’s food safety laws are based on the best and most current science. The food law is monitored and enforced by Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) in partnership with Michigan’s 45 local health departments.

The updated law includes the following key changes:

  • Allows small egg producers to sell directly to consumers without a license as long as a warning label is placed on the carton that states the eggs were packaged in a facility that has not been inspected by the MDARD
  • Prohibits the offering of undercooked hamburgers on children’s menus
  • Requires cut tomatoes and cut leafy greens to be kept refrigerated
  • Raises the annual gross sales limit for cottage food businesses from $15,000 to $20,000 beginning October 1 and to $25,000 in 2018
  • Allows licensed retail food establishments to sell at farmers markets, fairs or festivals without additional licensing
  • Requires mobile and special transitory food units to have a certified manager just as restaurants do
  • Includes provisions to assist state auditors in monitoring food establishments for Bridge Card fraud, which was once called “Food Stamp” fraud
  • Creates an updated scoring system for violations at licensed food establishments
  • Sets standards for food establishments to safely par-cook food (this is a technique where food is partially cooked, then cooled and finished later)

This updated law affects all of us in Michigan in one way or another when we eat out, sell or buy at farmers markets, sell or buy eggs and in many other ways. For more information on the updated food law, visit the Department of Agriculture & Rural Development.

Related Events

Related Articles