Plant Species Race Against Climate Change discussion to be held in Hickory Corners

Learn about the race for survival between native and invasive plant species from Michigan State University associate professor Dr. Jen Lau on Oct. 9.

Dr. Jen Lau will lead the discussion at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station on Oct. 9. (Photo by Michigan State University Extension).

Dr. Jen Lau will lead the discussion at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station on Oct. 9. (Photo by Michigan State University Extension).

Do you know any examples of how climate change affects plant species? Learn about the race for survival between native and invasive plant species from Michigan State University associate professor Dr. Jen Lau at Dessert with Discussion on Oct. 9 at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station.

At this free event learn from Dr. Lau how native plants are challenged by invasive species and human-caused changes, and what we can do to tip the balance to favor and preserve native species. Dr. Lau will present a lecture based on her research of plant biology and climate change, and answer questions from audience members.

Before the lecture, there will be delicious chef-crafted locally sourced desserts and a cash bar featuring Michigan craft beer and house wines, as well as informational booths from our event partners. Visit the informational booths to learn about practical steps you can take to engage climate change locally.

Thank you to event sponsors Kalamazoo Area Wild Ones and Solar Winds Power System, LLC.

Doors open at 7 p.m.; the lecture starts at 7:30 p.m. and will end at 8:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public, and will be held in the KBS Academic Building Auditorium, located at 3700 E. Gull Lake Dr., in Hickory Corners. Please register online in advance. To learn more, visit kbs.msu.edu, call 269-671-2360 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

The W.K. Kellogg Manor House is part of the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station. Celebrate with us our legacy of conservation as we mark 90 years since W.K. Kellogg donated the lands that now make up KBS to Michigan State University. Our commitment to research, education and outreach stands on the foundation of W.K. Kellogg’s vision for cutting-edge science and learning.

As MSU’s largest off-campus educational complex, we’ve put our land-grant values into practice as we’ve provided the public with examples of science’s crucial role in sustaining natural and managed communities for nearly a hundred years. As we look forward, our students and faculty are working to understand and solve real-world environmental problems for a better tomorrow. To learn more about KBS, visit us online at kbs.msu.edu.