New Year’s resolutions for kids

New Year’s resolutions can be a lot of fun for adults, but the fun doesn’t have to stop there. If you are a parent who enjoys making New Year’s resolutions don’t forget to involve your kids!

As adults we are prone to making New Year’s resolutions! According to Michigan State University Extension, resolutions are discussed on the television, with family and even with friends. Resolutions can be thought of as promises to do or not to do something and are often done at the beginning of the New Year to mark a new beginning. Resolutions can be a fun way for families to reflect on the past year and get excited about the New Year.

New Year’s resolutions can be a lot of fun for adults, but the fun doesn’t have to stop there. If you are a parent who enjoys making New Year’s resolutions don’t forget to involve your kids!

Laura Lewis Brown wrote on PBS Parents an article on Making New Year’s resolutions with your child. She suggests to:

  • Make it a family activity. Create a family tradition each December and reflect on the past year. Discuss accomplishments and goals as a family. In your resolutions you can talk about what worked this year and what didn’t.
  • Different resolutions for different ages. If your family is creating resolutions for each person, it’s helpful to consider what they need to work on in conjunction with their age. As your child ages, they can be more active in coming up with goals, which will mean more to them when they achieve the goal. For more information about age-appropriate New Year’s resolutions, see Helping kids make New Year’s resolutions by MSU Extension.
  • Serve as a role model. Take the lead! Your child is more likely to understand the value of goal setting if you take the lead and don’t forget that your child is watching.
  • Rewards are long lasting. We all know the feeling of meeting a goal, so don’t forget that children also relish that thrill of accomplishment, especially when their parents are acknowledging it.

Creating New Year’s resolutions, whether it’s a family resolution or a personal resolution, is essentially goal setting. For more information about setting goals, read another article by MSU Extension, Start the year off right with S.M.A.R.T. goals. The Michigan 4-H Youth Program uses the Targeting Life Skill Model as a guideline in making the connection between 4-H and life skills learned. Goal setting is one of the many life skills that youth involved in 4-H can gain. To learn more about Michigan 4-H Youth Programs and get youth involved in 4-H to help them develop life skills, visit your local MSU Extension office.

Related Articles