Great Lakes conference to feature drones, acoustic telemetry, rip currents and more

Current issues, opportunities and challenges relating to our Great Lakes will be on the agenda during "The Great Lakes: Moving Michigan Forward” event.

Mark Crowly looks at a book display during a break at Great Lakes Day at Michigan State University. Steve Stewart | Michigan Sea Grant

Mark Crowly looks at a book display during a break at Great Lakes Day at Michigan State University. Steve Stewart | Michigan Sea Grant

Are you interested in global water issues? Would you like to learn about how drones can help in water monitoring? Or maybe, you are concerned with phosporus in Lake Erie? Then you will want to attend this year’s 27th annual Great Lakes Conference as part of ANR Week. The conference is held from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, March 7, 2017, at the Kellogg Center on Michigan State University’s campus.

The conference is sponsored by the MSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, MSU Institute of Water Research, Michigan Sea Grant Extension, Office of the Great Lakes, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; and the US Geological Survey.

As any Michigan resident knows, the Great Lakes are one of our most valuable resources, providing countless benefits in the present and offering tremendous opportunities for the future. Yet we cannot ignore the significant challenges they face. Last year’s conference featured Michigan’s draft water strategy, and this year we’ll get an update. We will also learn about topics ranging from phosphorus to drones, Dark Skies parks to green infrastructure, and rip currents to global water issues.

Workshop presentation details are as follows:

  • Global Water Issues – Joan Rose, Professor and Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University
  • Moving the Water Strategy Forward – Jon Allan, Director, Office of the Great Lakes, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
  • Agricultural Phosphorus and Lake Erie: Perspectives from between the Lane and Lake – Laura Johnson, Director, National Center for Water Quality Research, Heidelberg University
  • Innovations in Water Monitoring using Drones– Justin Booth and Robert Goodwin, Center for Remote Sensing and GIS, Michigan State University
  • Green Infrastructure and Arts in the Wild – Pat Lindemann, Ingham County Drain Commissioner, Ingham County, Michigan
  • Rip Currents, Safety and Human Health– Ron Kinnunen, Senior Extension Educator, Michigan Sea Grant Extension, Michigan State University
  • Great Lakes, Dark Skies – Achieving Positive Change by Keeping it Dark in Michigan  – Mary Stewart Adams, Program Director, Headlands International Dark Skies park
  • Acoustic Telemetry in the Great Lakes – Lisa Peterson, PhD Student, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

Plan on joining others from around the state who want to learn more about our Great Lakes. Open to the public, conference registration is $10 (free for students).

If you are a K-12 or informal educator, you may be eligible to attend the Educator Luncheon and receive a stipend in support of your participation. Educators should contact Steve Stewart via email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). More information and registration available online.

Michigan Sea Grant helps to foster economic growth and protect Michigan’s coastal, Great Lakes resources through education, research and outreach. A collaborative effort of the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Michigan State University Extension, Michigan Sea Grant is part of the NOAA-National Sea Grant network of 33 university

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