Generic fungicide options

Editor’s note: This article is from the archives of the MSU Crop Advisory Team Alerts. Check the label of any pesticide referenced to ensure your use is included.

Following the trend in human medicines, “generic” versions are now available for some common fungicides used to treat plant diseases. This is due to the expiration of patents on various proprietary fungicide products. Generic products by law have to have the same amount of active ingredient as the original fungicides. However, there may be differences in inert ingredients or formulations.

Generic products tend to be more economical than brand name products, but most have not have been separately evaluated for disease control efficacy in Michigan and may not be mentioned in the crop sections of E-154 (Michigan Fruit Management Guide). However, most of them are briefly described in the “Fungicides and Bactericides for Fruit Crops” section of the guide. For more information on individual products, check out their labels or material safety data sheets on the following website: www.cdms.net. Generic products are presumed to be similar in disease control efficacy to their brand name counterparts. However, minor variations in efficacy, behavior or even phytotoxicity may occur due to formulation differences.

Do not assume that the labels of generic products are exactly the same as the brand name fungicides that you are used to. Sometimes there are differences in the crops that the product is labeled for or in the label instructions or restrictions. An example is Iprodione (iprodione), which is labeled for blueberries, whereas the brand name product Rovral (iprodione) is not. Also, Tebuzol (tebuconazole) is labeled for apples and pears, but other tebuconazole products such as Elite, Tebustar, and Orius are not. The table below lists generic versions of common fungicides. Read the fungicide label carefully before use as you would for any new product.

Brand name
Active ingredient
Generic versions
Aliette
fosetyl-Al
Legion
Aliette
phosphites (same breakdown product as fosetyl-Al)
ProPhyt, Phostrol, Agri-Fos, Rampart, Fosphite, Fungi-Phite, Topaz
Elite
tebuconazole
Orius, Tebuzol, TebuStar, AmTide Tebuconazole
Rally/Nova
myclobutanil
AgriStar Sonoma
Orbit
propiconazole
Bumper, PropiMax, Propiconazole E-AG, AmTide Propiconazole,
Ridomil
metalaxyl
MetaStar, Metalaxyl
Bravo
chlorothalonil
Chlorothalonil, Echo, Equus
Rovral
iprodione
Iprodione, Nevado
Topsin M
thiophanate methyl
Thiophanate Methyl, T-Methyl
Agri-Mycin
streptomycin
Ag Streptomycin, FireWall
MycoShield
tetracycline
FlameOut

Dr. Schilder’s work is funded in part by MSU‘s AgBioResearch.

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