Foot drop

Diabetics are at increased risk of foot drop.

Foot drop is caused by weakness or paralysis of the muscles involved in lifting the front part of the foot.

Foot drop is caused by weakness or paralysis of the muscles involved in lifting the front part of the foot.

Do you have diabetes or a chronic disease that affects your nerves or muscular system? Individuals with nerve or muscular disease and are diabetic are susceptible to nerve disorders. Being aware of your steps is very important for staying active and mobile.

What is food drop?

Foot drop isn’t a disease. Rather, foot drop is a sign of an underlying neurological, muscular or anatomical problem. Foot drop is caused by weakness or paralysis of the muscles involved in lifting the front part of the foot. Foot drop can be associated with nerve disorders.

According to Mayo Clinic, foot drop is a general term for difficulty lifting the front part of the foot. Individuals with foot drop may drag the front of the foot on the ground when walking.

Sometimes foot drop is temporary. In other cases, foot drop is permanent. If you have foot drop, you may need to wear a brace on your ankle and foot to hold your foot in a normal position.

Foot drop symptoms:

  • Foot drop makes it difficult to lift the front part of your foot, so it might drag on the floor when you walk. To counter this, you might raise your thigh when you walk, as if you were climbing stairs (steppage gait), to help your foot clear the floor. This odd gait might cause you to slap your foot down onto the floor with each step you take. In some cases, the skin on the top of your foot and toes may feel numb.
  • Foot drop typically affects only one foot. Depending on the underlying cause, however, it’s possible for both feet to be affected.

Possible foot drop causes:

  • Nerve injury
  • Muscle or nerve disorders
  • Stroke
  • Disorders that affect the spinal cord or brain
  • Tumor or cyst pressing on the nerve

To get help for foot drop, start by consulting with your family doctor or regular health care provider. For more news about foot drop, diabetes and chronic disease visit the Michigan State University Extension website.

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