Control of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot of sugar beet with fungicides and new Headline label

Editor’s note: This article is from the archives of the MSU Crop Advisory Team Alerts. Check the label of any pesticide referenced to ensure your use is included.

BASF announced a new use label for Headline as an in-furrow at-planting application for sugar beet as well as corn and soybeans. The label can be viewed here. I have conducted no trials on this application timing at MSU or, as far as I am aware, none have been conducted at Michigan Sugar Company according to Ralph Fogg. BASF has, however, sponsored a treatment for 2009. There were no data available from the APS web site (Fungicide and Nematicide tests or Plant Disease Management Reports). At this stage, although I have no supporting data to the contrary, it would be difficult for MSU to stand by this application timing although it may well be effective.

Crown and root rot was severe in many operations in 2008. Dr. Linda Hanson reported an interaction with the soil fungus Rhizopus that exasperated the problem. In trials conducted at the MSU Bean and Beet Farm, Saginaw, MI; sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv. 5534N) was PAT-treated and planted on April 21 and a fungicide timing study initiated. A full report is available on the Bean and Beet Annual Report 2008.

The soil moisture and temperature conditions enhanced development of crown and root rot. Quadris applied in furrow at planting had significantly lower plant stand, 25 DAP in comparison to the non-treated control. No treatments had significantly greater plant stand in comparison to the non-treated control. Proline applied at GS 4-6 also had significantly lower RAUEPC. The mean percentage of dead and dying sugar beets 127 DAP in the non-treated plots was 72.8 percent. Some treatments such as Quadris applied at GS 6-8 gave outstanding control of crown and root. Proline and Quadris applied at GS 4-6 also significantly reduced crown and rot in comparison to the non-treated control. No other treatment timings were effective. Quadris applied at GS 2-4 and 6-8 and Proline applied at GS 4-6 reduced incidence of crown and root rot of surviving plants in comparison to the non-treated control. Quadris applied at GS 4-6 and 6-8 reduced severity of crown and root rot of surviving plants in comparison to the non-treated control.

Dr. Kirk’s work is funded in part by MSU‘s AgBioResearch.

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