2015 Fruit insecticide registration update

Summary of insecticide and miticide label additions, clarifications and corrections to the 2015 Michigan Fruit Management Guide (E-154).

The following is a review of insecticide and miticide label changes and restrictions to the Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-154, “2015 Michigan Fruit Management Guide.” Agri-chemical labels and regulations can change quickly, so use this information within the context of each compound’s legal label.

Insecticide 2015 label additions, clarifications and corrections

Compound

Label changes/restrictions

Crop

Target pests

Sivanto 200SL

New label

Pome fruit, blueberries and grapes

Aphids, leafhoppers, scale mealybugs and blueberry maggots

Apta 15SC

New label

Stone fruits

Fruit flies, leafrollers and plum curculio

Grandevo

New label

Pome and stone fruits, blueberries, grapes, caneberries and strawberries

Lepidoptera, fruit flies, fruitworms and spotted wing Drosophila

Venerate

New label

Pome and stone fruits, blueberries, grapes, caneberries and strawberries

Lepidoptera, plum curculio, fruitworms and fruit flies

BeetleGONE

New label

Pome and stone fruits, blueberries, grapes, caneberries and strawberries

Japanese beetles

Nealta

New label

Pome fruits and grapes

Mites

Fyfanon ULV

Aerial application

Blueberries

Spotted wing Drosophila


New insecticide label information for compounds listed in 2015 E-154

MSU Fruit Management Guide E-154 product numbers are in parenthesis ().

Sivanto (flupyradifurone) belongs to the butenolide class of insecticides, which are agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Sivanto is registered in pome fruits, grapes and blueberries for control of several sap-feeding insects, including aphids, leafhoppers, psylla, scale insects and blueberry maggots. It is also registered in grapes for control of leafhoppers and mealybugs. Sivanto displays translaminar movement when applied to foliage and is xylem mobile. It has shown to be relatively safe on many beneficials, including honey bees. The maximum yearly amount of Sivanto 200SL that can be applied is 28 fluid ounces in pome fruits, grapes or blueberries per season.

Apta (3) (tolfenpyrad) belongs to the Mitochondrial Complex I Electron Transport Inhibitors (METI 1), which work by inhibiting cellular respiration in the mitochondria. Apta is registered in stone fruits for control of a range of pests including leafrollers, leafhoppers, plum curculio, Rhagoletis and Drosophila fruit flies (suppression of spotted wing Drosophila). The maximum yearly amount of Apta 15 SC that can be applied is 54 fluid ounces per acre in stone fruits.

Nealta (4) (cyflumetofen) is a beta-ketonitrile class miticide with a METI 2 (Group 25 acaracide) mode of action, labeled for use on pome fruits and grapes. Nealta provides knock-down and residual control of tetranychid mites such as European red mites and two-spotted spider mites. Nealta will control all life stages of these mites, including eggs, nymphs and adults. Because Nealta is not systemic, thorough coverage of plant surface is necessary for effective control. Nealta is relatively safe to beneficial arthropods. The maximum yearly amount of Nealta 200SC that can be applied is 27.4 fluid ounces (two applications).

Grandevo (6) (Chromobacterium subtsugae) is a mixture of metabolites produced by the bacterium during fermentation and the formulated product contains no viable cells. Grandevo is labelled for pome and stone fruits, blueberries, caneberries, strawberries and grapes, and is listed by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) for use in organic production. Grandevo is labelled for control of a range of leafrollers, aphids, fruitworms, codling moth, and has shown activity on spotted wing Drosophila in field trials. The proposed modes of action include repellency, reduced oviposition, reproduction of certain sucking insects and mites and a stomach poison for chewing insects. The use of a non-ionic adjuvant is recommended and the spray solution should be near neutral pH. Water with high mineral content should be avoided.

Venerate (7) (Burkholderia rinojensis) is a mixture of metabolites produced by the bacterium during fermentation and the formulated product contains no viable cells. Venerate is labelled for pome and stone fruits, blueberries, caneberries, strawberries and grapes, and is listed by the OMRI for use in organic production. Venerate is labelled for control of a range of leafrollers, fruitworms and plum curculio, and suppression of aphids, mites, thrips and stink bugs. The proposed mode of action is exposure to spray deposits and as a stomach poison. The use of a non-ionic adjuvant is recommended.

BeetleGONE (12) (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae) are aerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria that form crystals of protein called delta-exotoxins that when digested by Scarab beetle adults damage the stomach wall, causing feeding cessation which leads to death. BeetleGONE is labelled for control of Japanese beetles in pome and stone fruits, blueberries, caneberries, strawberries and grapes, and is listed by the OMRI for use in organic production.

Fyfanon ULV (13) (dimethyl dithiophosphate) is a malathion insecticide formulated for aerial application against spotted wing Drosophila in blueberries. It has a 24c label for use in Michigan through April 2019 with a maximum of five applications per season. There is also a 10-day minimum application interval and a one-day pre-harvest interval. The restricted entry interval is 12 hours. It is not expected to provide more than one week of residual control and it will lose significant activity if residues are subject to rainfall or overhead irrigation.

Drs. Wise, Isaacs and Gut’s work is funded in part by MSU AgBioResearch.

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