18- to 19-year-olds: Ages and stages of youth development

Understanding the different stages of youth development supports youth programming efforts as it encourages relationship building between youth and adult volunteers.

The final age bracket in this series will examine the older teens: 18- to 19-year-olds, who much prefer to be called “young adults.” This is the age where physically the growth and development has slowed, but socially and emotionally they are transitioning from what has been somewhat of a routine and protective environment to the unknown.

Much like the four previous articles looking at the characteristics and implications of working with 6- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, 12- to 14-year-olds and 15- to 17-year-olds, we will be looking at the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of 18- to 19-year-olds.

For a point of reference, physical development refers to the growth of the body and development of motor skills. Social development is the interaction between children and their ability to function in social settings. Emotional development looks at how youth handle their feelings and express them. Finally, intellectual development is all about how individuals learn.

Young adults ages 18 to 19 are developing in the following ways:

Physical

Social

Emotional

Intellectual

 

Implications of working with youth 18 to 19 year olds:

Physical

Social

Emotional

Intellectual

As adults support youth in moving on to the next step in their lives, remember that every child is unique. Regardless of their age, all youth have basic needs that adults and youth development programs should support:

For more information regarding understanding the ages and stages of child and youth development, contact your local Michigan State University Extension educator.