The Language of Emotions in Early Childhood

Date: December 3, 2013
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Location: Webinar
Contact: Molly Frendo at frendo@anr.msu.edu or 517-432-7606

By three years old, most children can use language to communicate their needs, desires, and thoughts, to make friends and join in play with their peers, to have conversations about their own and others emotions, and they are beginning to use language to control their own behavior through self-talk. But the links between language and social-emotional skills start much earlier – before children even utter their first words. Importantly, there are tools, or practices, that parents and early childhood professionals can use with young children to strengthen the link between early language and social-emotional skills, and support the development of both of these important domains. This presentation will describe the major milestones of development in language and social skills in early childhood, the links between these skills, and a set of practices for supporting these links, including the use of infant signs (aka Baby Signs or symbolic gestures) with preverbal children, and ways of talking with children toddlers that support their relationships, understanding of emotions, and self-control. 

This webinar begins at 2:00 p.m. on December 3, 2013

Presenter Bio:

Dr. Vallotton earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Simpson College, and a Ph.D. in Human Development from the University of California, Davis, mentored by Larry Harper, Linda Acredolo, and Kathy Conger. Following a year as a Faculty Fellow at UC Davis, she won a research training grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study as a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Education with mentors Kurt Fischer and Catherine Ayoub. The title of her NICHD-funded study was ‘Symbol and Social Skills in Typical and At-Risk Children.’

Visit the Language of Emotions in Early Childhood registration page for more information.

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